Almost Convergence.

The title of my last post "Almost Cauchy Sequence" made me wonder if "Almost Cauchy" was already defined in some formal sense. I could not find much on "Almost Cauchy" ... but I did find out about "Almost Convergence." (I think I have ran in to this before... but it is very neat... observe:)

A sequence S = S_n is almost convergent to L if for any \epsilon > 0 we can find an integer n such that the average of n or more consecutive terms in the sequence is within \epsilon of L. Formally, \forall \epsilon > 0 \quad \exists N \ni \quad \displaystyle \left| \frac{1}{n} \sum_{i=0}^{n-1} S_{k-i} -L    \right| < \epsilon \quad \forall n > N, \; k \in \mathbb{N}. (I took this definition from here, and I wonder why they didn't mention that we need k \geq n or else we are looking at negative terms in the sequence... But, maybe there is an interpretation of something like S_{-3}? Or maybe the author thinks that would be obvious? I'm going to ask at the mathematics stack exchange!)

  • John Robinhūdas

    Yes,yes and anotehr yes,i love your blog,there is so much good information.It will help me someday.Thank you.

  • http://mandyallen.com Mandy Allen

    I too could not find much on this phrase, although your own posts were the most prominent in the results!  I wonder if this may help your traffic rank eventually!